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. while serving in the navy he also managed to obtain advanced management training at harvard business school. you have a combination of practical military experience and sharp budgeting and management knowledge that the adderall possesses, respect for mike mullen is the reason so many distinguished chose to join this coalition and its now my pleasure to add general mike mullen. [applause] >> thanks for your leadership on this project which as you sit goes back decades, and i do appreciate all of you coming here today for what is a truly critical juncture for the nature and terms of our national security. our economic viability and continuing leadership role overseas. it was in response to a routine question more than years ago when i first link to these concerns. you ask me what is the greatest threat to the united states security. as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff i got asked that all the time. i answered in two words, that. i think i surprised him. today 50 former senior national security officials served across eight presidential administrations and formed the coalition to s
a sense of what relationships washington has with india and what would be priorities for both india navy? [inaudible] how is it going to help? >> let me start with your last question first. as far as the indian ocean organization that you related to that we are, we're not a part of but we are invited as an observer to it, but in general, throughout the into pacific region, first, you have to understand the breadth and scope of that region. is well over half the people in the world living in that region. all the major economies are in that region, including ours. seven of the 10 largest armies in that region. you can put all the comments in the world in the pacific ocean, put all of them in the pacific ocean and still have room for another africa, another candidate, another united states, another mexico. that's just in the pacific. the indian ocean is vast as will fix we have this really large, very dynamic, can't even call it a region. it's half the world, where you have historical ties between countries, bilateral, multilateral, and you have this, there is no one security organization t
the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issues here, with respect to china as they emerge, as a real leading nation is the ability to build bridges, to communicate to build strategic trust and cooperation, to enable every forum, the east asian summit, asian, and others, all bilateral come multilateral relationships in order to keep the volume as well as possible spent last year i had the privilege of interviewing henry kissinger about his book on china
at the army navy club here in washington, d.c., and it is a great pleasure to have with us today some of our real national treasures. and certainly lieutenant colonel, promotable trantor is among them -- j. b. vowell is among them. the tenant colonel vowell commander province called task force no slack which i think is really a phenomenal italian name, and also think it was a phenomenal italian -- [inaudible] in some of those difficult -- and one of the most difficult environments. lieutenant colonel vowell ripeness at stanford university doing his work college fellowship. [inaudible] >> cooperation spent all right. center for international security and cooperation. want to get your stanford bosses to let you come out here today. very, very happy. he's working on a thesis right now on afghanistan after 2014. but, of course, i got to know him while he was deployed in afghanistan, and got to visit his battalion. first, while he was out where we met, joe holiday at the time the no slack, and now the study of war, then again in february of 2011 at a commanders conference held by the colonel who
the country remember pearl harbor today and we do so being joined this morning by retired navy captain chuck nash, also a fox news military analyst. captain nash, good morning. good to have you here today. >> good morning, martha. martha: with all these things you get further and further away from them and fewer and fewer people were there and who remembered the events of that day. what do you is so important especially for young people to understand about the significance of pearl harbor? >> i think a lot of folks, young folks today have gone through a i am lar thing with 9/11. it was a galvanizing influence and it changed america forever. december 7th was a sneak attack and the nation when that day, when people found out what was going on there was no internet. so news traveled a little bit slower than it does today but it still went to every crevice of this country and the next day you had people lined up at recruiting stations. they wanted to go avenge that attack. so in a country that had seen war on the horizon, with the nazis invading poland and europe going into war, the americans co
exercising together our navies on things like humanitarian assistance. and i think there is room for that kind of cooperation and one of the things that we agreed while i was in china was that we would exchange younger people in our militaries, like from our military academies to spend time in each other's country and at each other's military schools. i think there is a lot to be gained by this. i think the more interaction we can have with these guys at a military and political level to complement the economic relationship will be all the better. >> rose: getting back to the middle east and other parts of the world and also in asia because of the presence of terrorism in asia as we have seen, you know, are we winning the battle of ideas with all of those groups now splinter groups, groups that emerged out of al qaeda so that they are less appealing and so that the effort to eliminate them is going better? >> i am not sure that i would say we are winning the battle of ideas, but ideas that we hate are losing. whatever, whatever the outcome of the changes in the middle east, in eg
counterparts there. just yesterday in my headquarters, the deputy chief of the p.l.a. navy was in hawaii in my headquarters receiving briefings on the future activities that our navys will do together, looking and talking through the issues of the rim of the pacific exercise of which you mentioned that will happen in 2014. we have a growing ability to have a tie log at the military level that's frank and open, and we do that through consulted talks we do on a periodic basis, and then we build a calendar of events on areas we think will have the most opportunity to have success working together. we build that calendar of events, and so far, we're having a very good record on meeting those objectives and actually completing them. right now i believe there's, in this time frame, i don't know exactly, but there's an exercise that we are doing in a bilateral way between the u.s. military and pay con and with the p.l.a. so, i just sent let the record show to my counterparts congratulating them on their promotions and hoping that we continue to have a good and open dialogue. because in the end, we ha
with my counter parts there. just yesterday in my headquarters, the deputy chief of the pla navy was in hawaii with my headquarters receiving briefings on the future activities that our navies will do together, looking, talking through the issues of the rim of the pacific exercise of which you mentioned that will happen in 20 # 14. we have a growing ability to have a dialogue at the military level that's frank and open. we do that through consulted talks that we do on a periodic basis, and then we build a calendar of events on the areas where we think we'll have the most opportunity to have success working together. we build that calendar of events, and so far, we're having a very good record on meeting objectives and actually completing them. right now, i believe there's, in this time frame, there's exactly -- but there's an hdr exercise we're doing in a bilateral way between the u.s. military, paycom, and the pla. i just sent letters to my counterparts, congratlating them on their promotions, and hoping that we continue to have is a good and open dialogue. in the end, it's, you
this happen by standing side by side as one team, as one joint facility, army, navy, air force. you have become one of the best medical teams in the world. and by raising expectations, by making clear that there is always hope, that good things can happen by advancing training, by increasing responsibility, our corpsmen, our medics are now capable of delivering life-saving medical care right there on the battlefield. this is the new standard of medical care, and i'm very proud to say that it is the most advanced in the world. a real revolution has taken place in battlefield medicine. it has truly been a revolution and in our ability to care for the most serious combat injuries. we have also seen that a higher survival rate can result in a new set of complex injuries when our soldiers return home. and you're responding to that challenge as well. here at the center of healing, the center of miracles, you have treated diseases that we've never seen before on our soil. you perform life-saving surgeries that are the first of their kind. and you've developed the most advanced prosthetics in th
as one team, as one joint facility; army, navy, air force. you have become one of the best medical teams in the world. and by raising expectations, by making clear that there's always hope that good things can happen, by advancing training, by increasing responsibility, our corpsmen, our medics are now capable of delivering life-saving medical care right there on the battlefield. this is the new standard of medical care, and i'm very proud to say that it is the most advanced in the world. a real revolution has taken place in battlefield medicine. it has truly been a revolution. and in our ability to care for the most serious combat injuries. we have also seen that a higher survival rate can result in a new set of complex injuries when our soldiers return home. and you're responding to that challenge as well. here at the center of healing, this center of miracles, you have treated diseases that we've never seen before on our soil. you've performed life-saving surgeries that are the first of their kind. and you've developed the most advanced prosthetics in the world. it's thanks to your ex
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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